Objects of Desire

Ready for Santa or ready for storage? You decide..
These are now the final 2 weeks before Jason travels to Germany to visit the Christmas Markets!
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These are now the final 2 weeks of the year in which you can take a glassblowing class with Jason or purchase a blown glass ornament or a set of 12,  whichever your tree and life and stockings to fill require. Acorns are ready to be displayed under your tree or on the table, chestnuts, pomegranate seeds and sunflower seeds, vessels with lid and without, exquisite work and daily tableware..
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Write or call THIS week if you still need a handful of ornaments.
Many glass objects of desire will soon be packed up… but will they be delivered by Santa or carefully stored in storage?
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medium shape acorn

 

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long shape acorn

Jason Stropko’s exquisite Batutto drinking glass

Batutto : 'carved' glass. Blown and 'carved' by Jason Stropko
Batutto : ‘carved’ glass. Blown and ‘carved’ by Jason Stropko

Such a rare opportunity to touch and drink from such a unique glass. I didn’t know that this kind of glass even existed, it’s not exactly what you find in Ikea or even more upmarket home interior stores.

A completely handmade glass: blown by hand. Recently Jason had a mould custom made from a drinking glass that he created. He uses the mould to make the drinking glass creation process more streamlined and the products more easily reproducible. Each drinking glass is still finished by hand, this is not the same as a completely mould blown process where the tops are ‘popped’, instead this mould acts as the guide to the final shape, which then has room to vary slightly, giving the  lovely handmade feeling.

This particular drinking glass was blown very thick and sturdy to allow plenty of room to battuto it. What is battuto? It is effectively carving of the glass, or rather grinding it with a glass grinding disk against which the glass is pressed to grind each facet that you see.

A single glass takes a good 90 minutes to battuto (this one actually took 2 hours!). But first it needs to be blown, for which it is really quite useful to have an assistant who can open and close the blow mould (it operates with a hinge and is tricky for the glassmaker to use alone unless he/she is an octopus).. After the glass is blown it enters the annealer, which is effectively a slow cooling down oven. The glass will idle in the annealer overnight on a long cooling cycle. This is essential or else the glass would be prone to cracking when it is knocked slightly, or it could just spontaneously combust, too.

Nobody wants a combusting drinking glass, right? After the glass has cooled down it then goes through the battuto process after which it is hot torched to soften sharp edges. And this is where I am not sure if it will be annealed once more..

You can imagine how rare such a battuto drinking glass is, but it also is a very old and traditional technique. If you ever are in need of a present that nobody else will bring to a favourite family members wedding or super special occasion then you now have an idea…

I just found this great link to A Murano website that explains Battuto better than I.

LINK to BATTUTO

Jason Stropko presents some of the ‘Tactile tableware’ set that is in development… First pieces are available already.

Jason Stropko presents some of the ‘Tactile tableware’ set that is in development… First pieces are available already..  Several items are ready to be shipped and others can be made to commission  within 7-10 days. (quicker turnaround time of as fast as 48 hours is sometime possible)

Tactile twisted ripple effect table ware set, blown glass, made by Jason Stropko
Tactile twisted ripple effect table ware set, blown glass, made by Jason Stropko

Orders are welcome for pieces to be made in good time for Christmas gift-giving season…  and it will be best if you can let Jason know by November 20th, this will allow lots of time to pay close attention to detail.

tactile twisted ripple effect : dessert bowls by Jason Stropko
tactile twisted ripple effect : dessert bowls by Jason Stropko